Book Reviews: November 2017

It’s been a busy month, so I only managed to read three books, but in my defense, two of them are pretty big, and at least they’re all good. Here goes:

Thunderstruck by Erik Larson:

This book follows the same formula as Erik Larson’s previous non-fiction book, Devil in the White City (which I love): telling two parallel stories, one of a social/historical importance, and the other a sensational murder case. In this case, it’s the invention of radio by Guglielmo Marconi and the case of Dr. Hawley Harvey Crippen, the first murder suspect to be captured with the aid of radiotelegraphy. It’s quite good, but I didn’t enjoy it as much as Devil in the White City, because I didn’t care about Marconi at all (he was kind of a dick) and the Crippen murder is nowhere near as captivating as the murders of H.H. Holmes. The book does pick up toward the last third, when it focuses solely on Crippen, but it’s not quite enough. 3/5

The Time Traveler’s Guide to Medieval England by Ian Mortimer:

I’ve read Ian Mortimer’s other “Time Traveler’s Guide” book, which is about Elizabethan England, and loved it, and this one doesn’t disappoint. I love reading about historical everyday life, and it’s rare to find one like this, full of vivid and entertaining (and sometimes straight-up disgusting, but in a good way) descriptions. It really brings the period to life, as opposed to just listing off facts and figures. Highly recommended. 5/5

The Illustrated Man by Ray Bradbury:

I’ve just been hired to translate this, which is really exciting because after Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett, Bradbury is my favorite sci-fi/fantasy writer. Ironically, my favorite book of his (Dandelion Wine) is actually neither sci-fi nor non-fiction, but that doesn’t mean I don’t enjoy his other works. This contains some pretty chilling stories, like something you’d find on Black Mirror today (“The Veldt”, “Marionettes Inc.”), some are surprisingly moving (“The Rocket”, “The Rocket Man”, “The Last Night of the World”), and some are just so cinematic I’m surprised they haven’t been adapted already (“The Fox and the Forest”, “The Visitor”). My only complaint is that the messages in some of them are a bit too on-the-nose (“The Other Foot”, “The Man”), but that’s minor. 4.5/5

What about you guys? What have you read?



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